Coriolis Symposium - Indoor and outdoor air biocontamination

Bertin's Team has organized the Aerobiology Symposium on March 27th 2013 during the exhibition ContaminExpo. Aerobiology Symposium

The symposium focus was the sharing of bio-aerosols sampling experimentations with Coriolis micro. The speakers have presented their applications in various fields such as hospitals, indoor air, outdoor air, veterinary, glove box and isolators.

 


Coriolis Symposium Program

These conferences have been chaired by Mr Michel Thibaudon, European Aerobiology Society President (EAS).

  • "Airborne diffusion of Pneumocystis" – Anne Totet, Amiens Hospital, France.
  • "Fungal airborne contamination in animal farms" – Jacques Guillot , The veterinary college of Alfort (ENVA), France.
  • "Composting bioaerosols : sampling in industrial area and analysis by molecular methods" - Nathalie Wéry, French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), Narbonne, France.
  • "Coriolis and viruses: indoor air quality and decontamination solutions" - Vincent Moulès, VirNext, Lyon, France.
  • "Assessment of fungal exposure in indoor environments : comparison of methods" - Pierre Le Cann, EHESP School of Public Health, Rennes, France.

download the offical program!

 

 
Coriolis Symposium Abstracts

 

Aerobiology Introduction - Michel Thibaudon, European Aerobiology Society President (EAS)

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"Airborne diffusion of Pneumocystis" - Anne Totet, Amiens Hospital, France.

Anne TOTET1, Céline DAMIANI1, Firas CHOUKRI2, Solène Le GAL3, Jean MENOTTI2, El Mouktar ALIOUAT4, Eduardo DEI CAS4, Gilles NEVEZ3, Francis DEROUIN2.
1 Laboratoire de Parasitologie et Mycologie, CHU d’Amiens ; EA 4285, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens.
2 Laboratoire de Parasitologie et Mycologie, Hôpital Saint Louis ; EA 3520, Université Paris Diderot, Paris.
3 Laboratoire de Parasitologie et Mycologie, CHU de Brest ; EA 3882, Université de Brest, Brest.
4 Laboratoire de Biologie et Diversité des Pathogènes Eucaryotes, INSERM U1019, CNRS UMR8204, Institut Pasteur, Lille.

Pneumocystis jirovecii is responsible for a disease affecting immuno-depressed patients: Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). Airborne transmission of Pneumocystis has been demonstrated in animal models and is highly probable in humans. However, information concerning burdens of Pneumocystis jirovecii in exhaled air from infected patients is lacking due to the technical limitations of the current sampling methods. This fungus is indeed not cultivable, so impaction method based on the cultivability of microorganisms cannot be used. Also, the difficulties of extraction from a solid support or the lengthy conditions of sampling (filtration technique) let us to consider alternative methods that would be suitable for both sampling and quantifying P. jirovecii in air. Our objective is to evaluate P. jirovecii air diffusion in patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia with Coriolis air sampler sampling combined with RT-PCR assays.

Key words: Pneumocystis, airborne diffusion, hospital infection, fungal contamination.

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"Fungal airborne contamination in animal farms" - Jacques GUILLOT, UMR BIPAR, Dynamyc, Ecole Nationale Vétériniare d’Alfort, Maisons-Alfort

Fungal elements represent a significant part of the biological contaminants that could be detected in air and many investigations demonstrated that exposure to airborne fungal particles can cause a variety of adverse health effects in humans and farm animals. However, the dynamic impact of airborne fungi on indoor agricultural air quality remains poorly understood. This is partly due to the lack of standardized sampling methodology and the need of appropriate culture media and conditions adapted for surveys in highly contaminated places like avian farms or stables. The research team Dynamyc assessed the relative efficiencies of air sampling methods and identification techniques for the quantification of airborne (culturable or not) fungi in poultry farmhouses in France and China. Our perspectives include the use of Coriolis® air sampler for the detection of resistant Aspergillus fumigatus isolates in avian farms and for the characterization of fungal contamination in stables where horses with RAO (Respiratory Airway Obstruction) are housed.


Key words: farm animals, poultry, fungi, Aspergillus, aerocontamination

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"Composting bioaerosols : sampling in industrial area and analysis by molecular methods" - Nathalie Wéry, French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), Narbonne, France.

Wéry N1., O. Le Goff1, H. Bacheley2, J.-P. Steyer1 and J.-J. Godon1
1 INRA, UR50, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l’Environnement,  Narbonne, France 
2 Veolia Environnement Recherche et Innovation, Limay, France
Contact :, nathalie.wery@supagro.inra.fr, tel. (33) 4 68 42 51  86

Bioaerosols generated at composting plants are released during processes that involve vigorous movement of material. They are a cause of concern because of their potential impact on the health of workers and residents living close to such facilities.
The microbial diversity of bioaerosols collected at five open industrial composting plants treating different types of waste was characterized by a culture-independent approach. Core species of the composting bioaerosols were identified. Among them, three phylotypes were quantified by qPCR in air collected outdoor in natural environments and on ten composting plants together with 4 other microbial markers: cultivable bacteria and fungi, total bacteria (epifluorescence microscopy) and viable bacteria (solid-phase cytometry). A combination of three microbial indicators relevant to monitor composting bioaerosols was defined: one general indicator of bioaerosol emission, the viable bacteria, and two bacterial phylotypes specific to composting bioaerosol, NA07, affiliated to Saccharopolyspora sp. and NC38, affiliated to the Thermoactinomycetaceae. In conclusion, defining the microbial signature of composting aerosols gave us access to indicators that could be used for analyzing bioaerosol dispersal outside composting platforms.

Key words: bioaerosol, diversity, indicators, dispersal.

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"Coriolis and viruses: indoor air quality and decontamination solutions" - VirNext, Vincent.moules@univ-lyon1.fr

VirNext is a private technological platform (EZUS), which markets scientific technologic and logistic services and consulting toward industrials in the field of vaccine, antiviral molecules and air/water decontamination. Indoor air pollution is characterized by chemical (VOC) and biological pollutants, which is involved in the generation of respiratory failures, cardiovascular disease, asthma, allergies and cancers. VirNext has developed broad expertise in the evaluation of different air decontamination technologies against viruses, bacteria and molds in vitro and in situ. Coriolis was integrated in several experimental set-up (one pass tunnel and nebulization chamber) to optimize yields and reproducibility in the collecting process of microorganisms. VirNext currently develops experimental protocols using Coriolis to evaluate the performance of air decontamination unit in situ.        

Key words : Air decontamination technologies, viruses, tests in vitro and in situ.

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"Assessment of fungal exposure in indoor environments : comparison of methods" - Pierre LE CANN, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Santé Publique, pierre.Lecann@ehesp.fr

For several years, there has been an increase in respiratory diseases in the population, especially asthma. Pollution, increased allergic susceptibility are clearly involved. But in recent years, many studies have also shown the role of indoor environment in these conditions, and in particular certain chemical and microbial compounds. In addition, improving the energy performance of homes has also increased the confinement and thus exposure to indoor contaminants. This exhibition is all the more important that we spend nearly 90% of our time indoors (housing, workplaces, transport, ...).
The role of fungi has been clearly established in the occurrence of respiratory disorders and in particular the exacerbation of asthma. However, there is no consensus on the best method to collect and analyze mold in the indoor environment. The Coriolis was tested under different conditions and showed particular interest for analysis by molecular methods.

Key words : Indoor, molds, QPCR.

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